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Can Bully Breed Dogs Swim?

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unnamed (2)It is so hot out! the suns beating down, you’re laying on your float relaxing in the pool and your American bully is circling the pool panting and crying. Maybe taking him in for a dip will hit the spot just like it did for you?  But wait, can bully breed dogs swim? Well, despite  a popular swimming stroke being named after our furry friend ” the doggy paddle”, not all dogs can swim.

Certain breeds are likely to be natural swimmers.  There are 15 breeds which are known for getting their paws wet! If you are looking to pick a breed to share water time with you will want to take a look at the following: Newfoundland, Cocker Spaniel, Vizsla, Weimaraners, Schipperke, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, Spanish Water Dog, Portuguese Water Dog, Irish Water Dog, Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever, Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Standard Poodle and Irish or English Setter breeds tend to fall into the Naturals category. Breeds such as the English Bulldog, Corgi and Pug are more likely to have difficulty when it comes to water.

Not every dog can swim. But many breeds can learn to swim and enjoy being in the water. Every dog is different just like people but through a safe introduction to the water it is possible to make a swimmer out of your dog!

We are going to introduce your American Bully to the pool or beach by swimming lessons!

Pick a time to introduce them to the water that lacks chaos and loud noises. Do not decide to teach your dog how to swim while there is a BBQ going on and 10 kids in the pool screaming and  throwing toys.  It is  going to be too difficult for them to focus on their lesson while there is so much other distracting stuff going on.

Know  your swimming spot. If you are using a pool, make sure there is an easy entry/exit point. If you are using a natural body of water, avoid a river, the moving water will add stress and unknowns to your lesson. If you are using a lake or pond make sure there are no plants that can tangle your dogs legs up.

Panic or fear of water will set you up to fail. A lot of people think that  simply throwing the dog into the pool will set his natural instinct to swim in motion, instead all you are going to accomplish is a fear and panic associated with the water . Your dog may paddle frantically  and actually “swim” to a exit but he will not associate the water with a good experience and will most likely avoid  the water at all cost after this incident. It will leave a long lasting fear.

Have treats, pats and hugs on hand. Positive reinforcement for being a good boy will go miles, just as in potty training or leash training. Your dog likes to know he did something that makes you proud.

If you have shallow water the best way to get your dog into the water is on his own. Throw in a ball or his favorite toy and let him run in to get it. Once your dog is  comfortable in the water on their feet you can introduce them to deeper water to begin to learn how to swim. If you are using a pool and this is not an option you can go onto the next part which is picking your dog up and carrying them into deeper water.

The proper way to introduce your dog to the water is to support their weight in the water let them learn to  paddle or move their legs in the water free of supporting their own weight.  This can be accomplished by supporting them under their torso; specifically supporting their midsection and hindquarters. It is important your dog learns to move all 4 legs just as he does when he runs. Moving only the fronts will turn the back legs into anchors and will drag your dog underwater. You want to make sure you keep both hands on your dog until their stroke is steady and in good form. You want to see your dog is confident in their stroke as well.

Make sure your dog knows where the exit is. Repetition of the exit will ease your dogs mind in knowing there is a safe and easy way to get out of the water once they are tired or had enough.  You will need to continually point them in the  correct direction before it sinks into memory.

Over exertion can be a serious problem in the water. Keep your  swimming lessons to a 10-15 minute maximum and give your dog  ample breaks in between.  Once your dog is tired he will simply give up in the water and this can lead to drowning. Dogs who easily become tired on land will also easily become tired in the water.

Never leave your dog unattended by the pool, just as you would not leave a child unattended.  Even if your dog is a pro swimmer, mistakes happen and lead to horrific results.

Despite all the right tools some dogs are just not going to be swimmers or even like the water. If you have made every effort possible to teach your dog to swim and he resists going into the water or near it then you just do not have a swimmer! The American Bully breed are not natural swimmers, but with some educational time in the pool you may be able to make a water companion out of them.  Do not get easily discouraged and please make sure to be safe in and around the water.

 

 

Facts & Tips

What is an Exotic Bully? | Opinions from Breeders in the Bully Community

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Exotic Bully

First, let us start off by stating that Bully Girl Magazine loves all breeds. With that said, there has been a lot of controversy over the past few years about a new breed of dog. The Exotic Bully. Those who brought this breed about and the many who have followed, love the Exotic Bully Breed. However, there are also many who despise this new breed, and feel that it is an unhealthy representation. Once more, there are a great deal of people who don’t even know what an Exotic Bully is.

Bully Girl Magazine looks to shed some light on this new Exotic Bully Movement. We have decided to get opinions from bully dog breeders, as well other bully community members around the world. We simply asked all these people the same two questions:

In your own words, what is an Exotic Bully?
What is your opinion on the new Exotic Bully Breed Movement?

The responses we received were interesting. The Exotic Bully is definitely a controversial topic on a global scale. Read the responses below and let us know what you think about the Exotic Bully Breed and Movement in our comments section.

Jacobi Guyton – The Bully Kingdom (Texas)

“Hmmmm, to me an exotic bully is exactly like the name exotic! Something special that you don’t see too often. My perfect exotic bull would be short and clean, with a slight bow on the front. It would have a full tail, and be very functional.”
“Since there is no standard for the exotic class. I feel that there are too many experiments out there. However, I have also seen some dope ass exotics bulls out there too. D1 Kennels does a great job in that class!”

Tim Levi – Elite Bully Kennels (Florida)

“Exotics in our opinion are Bullies that have been bred to the extreme by pushing the envelope of the breed standard.”
“Although we prefer pockets and standard American Bullies, we have friends that own everything from exotics to XL’s. To each his own. Who are we to judge? After all, this breed was founded on pushing the limits, since it’s inception.”

Orlando Ortiz – Hammerhead Bullies (Texas)

“An exotic bully is a smaller compact Bully with bulldog features.”
“The exotic bully breed movement is nice if it’s bred right. If you scatter too much blood around it can get messy.”

Jessica Wade – Unleashed Kennels (Georgia)

“You know, I have a few friends that breed Exotics and to each their own. They aren’t my preferred style of dog. But I have to say, I have seen some clean correct ones lately. If I had to describe it, I would say it’s an over-exaggerated style of features on a smaller, more compact dog.”
“I have no problem with it when done correctly. A functional dog should be the result. When the quality of life for these dogs gets compromised,  I get upset. Dogs should not die at an early age due to health related issues.”

Carlos Hernandez – Pound4Pound Bullys (Connecticut)

“In my opinion an Exotic Bully is simply the look of the dog. Certain features in the dog make it exotic, not just the bloodlines.”
“I have no problems with the exotic breed as that is what I am currently breeding. I definitely enjoy having exotics. The designer looks they carry as well as their temperaments is something I love.”

Brandon Johnson – Triple J Bullies (Louisiana)

“An exotic bully is a man’s best friend!”
“I love it. I can see things changing. A lot of folks are becoming aware of the breed, and we’re here to make a mark.”

Haile Selassie – H.D. Bullyz (Pennsylvania)

“An exotic to me is something that is not ordinary, or is different than the usual.”
“I feel there is room for all likings. Hopefully, with more time we will see more improvement in the breed.”

From what we can gather, the Exotic Bully Breed is a new designer breed. When bred right you will have an exotic looking bully that will still be functional. When bred wrong, it can lead to various health issues, which can shorten the life span of the dog. Everyone has different opinions when asked about the exotic bully. What are your opinions on the Exotic Bully Breed movement? Leave a comment below and share opinion on this topic.

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Bull Terrier: Origin, Stereotypes, Temperament

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The Bull Terrier

Bull Terriers are a type of terrier that are best known for their outwardly sloped “egg” faces. For many people, the most recognizable Bull Terrier is Spot, the Target mascot. We will discuss the Bull Terrier’s origins, stereotypes, and the reasons that this breed makes a wonderful companion.

The Origin of the Bull Terrier

Bull Terriers have a long history, dating back to the early 1800’s in England. Initially, “Bull and Terrier” breeds had two purposes: for vermin control, and for participation in popular blood sports of the day. The original Bull and Terrier breeds were based on Old English Bulldogs (a now-extinct breed) and Old English Terriers. Since the exact lineage of these dogs is unknown, it is probable that other terrier breeds were represented as well.

As a group of dogs, Bull and Terrier breeds were intended to have the speed and agility of the more lightly built terriers, but the tenacity of the Bulldog. The goal was to create an animal that would perform well in combat situations. This was required for animals used in blood sports. Sadly, many of these dogs were bred for fighting bulls and bears for entertainment, which necessitated a strong-willed, fearless animal that had both strength and speed.

Despite the value of a bulldog / terrier cross during the evolution of the Bull Terrier, little was done to preserve the ancestry of this dog. No breed standards existed until the mid-1900’s, and breeding was solely based on performance measures, as opposed to the dog’s appearance. Eventually, Bull and Terrier breeds were divided into two groups: Bull Terriers and Staffordshire Bull Terriers. The latter of which was smaller and easier to handle than the former.

The 1850’s

In the mid-1850’s, James Hinks began breeding Bull and Terrier type dogs to the now-extinct English White Terrier. His intention was to create an animal with a cleaner appearance, better legs, and a nicer head than standard terriers. In 1862, he entered a dog named “Puss” into the Bull Terrier Class in a Chelsea dog show. Puss was immediately popular, and thus “Hinks Breed,” also known as “The White Cavalier,” was born. Over time, what is now known as the Bull Terrier was bred with Dalmatian, Whippet, Spanish Pointer, Borzoi, and Rough Collie to create the dog as we know it today. The first modern Bull Terrier, named “Lord Gladiator,” was recognized in 1917.

Although Tom Hinks set out to create an all-white dog, there are many health problems associated with all-white coloring, including deafness. In 1936, the AKC began recognizing colored Bull Terriers, with brindle being the preferred coloring today.

Bull Terrier Stereotypes

Bull Terriers are not commonly considered a fighting breed. However, to the uninformed they suffer from many of the same stereotypes as other bully breeds. Indeed, the blanket term “pit bull” commonly includes Bull Terriers.
One of the top stereotypes of this breed is that it is vicious, which could not be further from the truth. In fact, part of the breed standard for the Bull Terrier is a “gentleman” temperament.

Another common stereotype of pit bull-type dogs is that they have locking jaws, which will latch onto humans, dogs, or other animals and never let go. Again, this stereotype has been proven time and again to be merely a myth.

Bull Terriers are also unfairly assumed to be poor candidates for living with children and other pets. It is true that some terriers are inherently dog-aggressive. However, the Bull Terrier is well known for its ability to get along well with other animals, especially when properly socialized. Similarly, Bull Terriers are widely considered one of the top breeds for children, due to their fun-loving nature.

While people commonly assume that all forms of pit bulls have been bred for fighting, this is simply not true. Indeed, James Hinks’ original Bull Terrier was not intended for the fighting ring, and instead as a “gentleman’s companion.”

Bull Terriers as Companions

What makes Bull Terriers great dogs and companions? The typical Bull Terrier personality should be charming, mischievous, and playful, which is why this dog is revered by many. Part of the reason this breed was initially called the “White Cavalier” is because of the level of chivalry a Bull Terrier is supposed to possess. For instance, this dog should never start a fight, but should be courageous enough to finish one.

Additionally, the Bull Terrier socializes well with both humans and other animals. Indeed, according to a poll conducted by the American Kennel Club, 94% of Bull Terrier owners say this breed is good with children. In addition, 84% of owners say this breed is good with other dogs. Since the Bull Terrier was never intended to be a pit-fighter, few Bull Terriers display inherent dog-aggression.

For many dog owners, Bull Terriers are ideal because they can be very independent dogs. They have an even temperament and accept discipline well. At times they can be stubborn, which makes them better for experienced dog owners; however, they are extremely people-oriented pets. As with any dog, socialization is necessary for ensuring they get along well with unfamiliar people and animals. In terms of temperament, a 2008 German study showed that the Bull Terrier most closely matches that of the Golden Retriever. The Golden Retriever is widely regarded as one of the most family-friendly canine companions.

The Standard Bull Terrier

The Bull Terrier is a short, dense dog that weighs 55 – 65 lbs. Shorter in stature than a typical pit bull, these dogs make great companions for people who prefer a smaller dog. Miniature Bull Terriers also exist. They stand only 14’’ tall at the shoulder, and are approximately half the height of the Standard Bull Terrier. The average lifespan of this breed is 10 – 14 years, which typical for a dog of this size. Bull Terriers do not require extensive grooming, due to their short, rough coat.
Ultimately, the Bull Terrier is an older breed with origins in England. Bull Terriers are unfairly stereotyped, like all “pit bulls”. At the end of the day, they make fantastic companions due to their friendly and loving nature.

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Ruff House Rescue | Millions of Adobtable Pets are sitting in Shelters

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Ruff House Rescue

Ruff House Rescue saves homeless pets from kill shelters here, and across the country. Animal rescue has become a necessity because euthanasia is the primary solution. Shelters (funded by your tax dollars) have been put in place to solve the homeless pet problem. Without rescues like Ruff House, countless more would perish in the shelter system, which euthanizes healthy, adoptable pets every day.

Ruff House Rescue pulls hundreds of animals every year from these shelters and finds these pets the loving homes they deserve. Ruff House is comprised of dedicated volunteers, who give their time and their love to help save so many. Once having been rescued by us from a shelter, each pet is vaccinated, altered and micro-chipped. They are loved and cared for until they find a home to call their own. This could take a day or a year. No adoptable animal is euthanized.

Bully Girl Magazine had a chance to sit down with the president and founder Diane Indelicato for an exclusive interview, to let her explain what Ruff House Rescue is all about. Here is what she had to say:

Tell our readers about Ruff House Rescue, and how it all began.

Ruff House Rescue started in 2009. We’re a 501c 3 organization. There has always been a tremendous need for rescue, especially for the bully breed. We started pulling pit bull breeds and other breeds from the Manhattan and Brooklyn shelters, and rehoming them. We have foster homes for our dogs, and we have our own facility here in Freeport, NY on the nautical mile. Our dogs are spayed, neutered, vaccinated and microchipped before they go to a new home. Adopters must be approved before any dog is sent home. We’ve rescued and found new forever homes for a lot of dogs since our inception.

Do you focus on mostly rescuing bully breeds, or do you rescue all dog breeds?

We rescue all types of dogs. A lot of people are confused with what dog rescue actually means. While we encourage dog adoption, we do understand that bully breed dogs aren’t for everybody, so we do rescue and find homes for all types of dogs. People are very open to adopting, so we want them to understand know that there are all types of dogs to adopt, and that rescuing doesn’t pertain to any one breed of dog. They can come in and meet all of the different breeds that we have rescued, and see which is the perfect fit for their family.

Explain to our readers, why it is so important to spay or neuter their pets.

Rescuing is not just all about adopting out dogs to new homes. It’s also about educating people to help them understand why they need to spay and neuter their pets. The main reason is because millions of beautiful, adoptable pets around the world are sitting in shelters, and are euthanized daily. I don’t think there is enough awareness. I think people need to get involved, and make a difference. Adopting might not be as convenient as going to a puppy store or breeder, but for every puppy or dog that you are buying a shelter dog is being euthanized somewhere. So we just want people to be educated and aware of what is going on.

What would be the best way for someone who is looking to adopt, to get in touch with Ruff House Rescue?

To adopt a puppy or dog from our facility, please visit our website at www.ruffhouserescue.org. You can also email us at [email protected], or you can visit our facebook page at facebook.com/ruffhouserescueny.

 

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