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Mastitis: Breast Health in Female Dogs

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images6DW9G5GNOne of the first signs we look for that a breeding has taken the size of the breasts to increase. Generally before you even see a belly begin to form you will see swollen breasts beginning to fill with milk for the arriving pups.  From the time the breasts begin to swell until the puppies have been successfully whelped it is very important to keep a close eye on your females breast health and condition. Mastitis can occur very quickly and is very aggressive! What is mastitis? Mastitis is an infection of the milk ducts. This condition mainly affects females after delivery, but it can occur rarely in pseudopregnant lactating females as well. Mastitis contains E-coli  and other bacteria sent traveling through your dogs blood stream and can be potentially life threatening if left untreated.

Mastitis can happen from a number of different causes so it is very important to pay close attention to your nursing moms breast condition. Mastitis can form from a blocked milk duct, a tear in the tissue around the nipple( possibly from an overaggressive nurser), or even an over engorgement of the breast. Bacteria can even enter from the pores around the breast and cause Mastitis.

How can you tell if you are looking at  mastitis or just normal swelling of the breast due to pregnancy? An infected breast is very obvious to the naked , even untrained eye. A normal nursing breast will be large, milk filled soft to the touch and body temperature consistent. An infected breast will be  hard to the touch, often very, very, hot to the touch and could be  severely discolored or lumpy. Other overall symptoms can include lethargy, loss of appetite, puppy neglect, fever and dehydration.

Breast infection; Mastitis needs to be handled immediately and appropriately to avoid breast loss. Lack of treatment can lead to Gangrene mastitis. Which will cause the skin to turn black, die and basically erupt like a volcano, leaving a large hole in the breast that will drain pus and blood. This can ultimately result in total loss of the breast. Left untreated, mastitis can cause your dog to go into septic shock which could result in death. This is a matter that must be handled by a vet and promptly to avoid serious risk or even death.

Mastitis will present with a high fever since it is an infection. The treatment for mastitis is an antibiotic regiment, usually prescribed is Clavamox and dosage is based on females size and weight.  In addition the your antibiotic regime, warm compress , with water and vinegar of the infected breasts several times a day for 5-10 minutes per application well help soothe the breast tissue ands bring the infection to a head for easier consumption back into the body, while the antibiotics fight the infection.  Gentle  massages of the breast to help break up the infection from the hard lump its compressed into will also help the healing process.

While under treatment for infection, you should not allow puppies to nurse off the mother.  Infection can pass onto puppies if they happen to suck and ingest some of the bacteria present in the mother. Often times the infection area may come to a head and leak and the puppies could easily ingest and become ill. The puppies small fragile immunes systems have no antibodies to fight infection and could result in serious illness or death.

Since your female is full of milk and no puppies to relieve the pressure, you will need to milk your dog to avoid the infected breast getting worse, or other breasts to become infected from clogging and backing up of the ducts. Mastitis will heal faster if you are expressing the milk from the infected breast. Some vets may prescribe Oxytocin to dry up the milk which will help expedite the healing but will also ensure you on bottle feeding for the remainder of the whelping.

As with all infections, a keen eye,  and prompt treatment are the key to success.  You should see your dog returning to normal in about a week if treatment is successful. With proper treatment breast health should be restored to normal and you should have no long lasting medical issues . All normal nursing functionality should be present on your next breeding.  Please do not feel as though you did something wrong and let your down  if your dog develops mastitis, its common and often times unavoidable since it happen so easily and quickly. The sign you are a good breeder is caring for your dog properly and ensuring their return good health.

CO-Owner of Bully Girl Magazine, LLC, Jennifer Carter has been part of the Bully Girl brand since day one. She is also one of our Senior Writers, as well as head of Social Media for the Bully Girl Brand.

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What is an Exotic Bully? | Opinions from Breeders in the Bully Community

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Exotic Bully

First, let us start off by stating that Bully Girl Magazine loves all breeds. With that said, there has been a lot of controversy over the past few years about a new breed of dog. The Exotic Bully. Those who brought this breed about and the many who have followed, love the Exotic Bully Breed. However, there are also many who despise this new breed, and feel that it is an unhealthy representation. Once more, there are a great deal of people who don’t even know what an Exotic Bully is.

Bully Girl Magazine looks to shed some light on this new Exotic Bully Movement. We have decided to get opinions from bully dog breeders, as well other bully community members around the world. We simply asked all these people the same two questions:

In your own words, what is an Exotic Bully?
What is your opinion on the new Exotic Bully Breed Movement?

The responses we received were interesting. The Exotic Bully is definitely a controversial topic on a global scale. Read the responses below and let us know what you think about the Exotic Bully Breed and Movement in our comments section.

Jacobi Guyton – The Bully Kingdom (Texas)

“Hmmmm, to me an exotic bully is exactly like the name exotic! Something special that you don’t see too often. My perfect exotic bull would be short and clean, with a slight bow on the front. It would have a full tail, and be very functional.”
“Since there is no standard for the exotic class. I feel that there are too many experiments out there. However, I have also seen some dope ass exotics bulls out there too. D1 Kennels does a great job in that class!”

Tim Levi – Elite Bully Kennels (Florida)

“Exotics in our opinion are Bullies that have been bred to the extreme by pushing the envelope of the breed standard.”
“Although we prefer pockets and standard American Bullies, we have friends that own everything from exotics to XL’s. To each his own. Who are we to judge? After all, this breed was founded on pushing the limits, since it’s inception.”

Orlando Ortiz – Hammerhead Bullies (Texas)

“An exotic bully is a smaller compact Bully with bulldog features.”
“The exotic bully breed movement is nice if it’s bred right. If you scatter too much blood around it can get messy.”

Jessica Wade – Unleashed Kennels (Georgia)

“You know, I have a few friends that breed Exotics and to each their own. They aren’t my preferred style of dog. But I have to say, I have seen some clean correct ones lately. If I had to describe it, I would say it’s an over-exaggerated style of features on a smaller, more compact dog.”
“I have no problem with it when done correctly. A functional dog should be the result. When the quality of life for these dogs gets compromised,  I get upset. Dogs should not die at an early age due to health related issues.”

Carlos Hernandez – Pound4Pound Bullys (Connecticut)

“In my opinion an Exotic Bully is simply the look of the dog. Certain features in the dog make it exotic, not just the bloodlines.”
“I have no problems with the exotic breed as that is what I am currently breeding. I definitely enjoy having exotics. The designer looks they carry as well as their temperaments is something I love.”

Brandon Johnson – Triple J Bullies (Louisiana)

“An exotic bully is a man’s best friend!”
“I love it. I can see things changing. A lot of folks are becoming aware of the breed, and we’re here to make a mark.”

Haile Selassie – H.D. Bullyz (Pennsylvania)

“An exotic to me is something that is not ordinary, or is different than the usual.”
“I feel there is room for all likings. Hopefully, with more time we will see more improvement in the breed.”

From what we can gather, the Exotic Bully Breed is a new designer breed. When bred right you will have an exotic looking bully that will still be functional. When bred wrong, it can lead to various health issues, which can shorten the life span of the dog. Everyone has different opinions when asked about the exotic bully. What are your opinions on the Exotic Bully Breed movement? Leave a comment below and share opinion on this topic.

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Bull Terrier: Origin, Stereotypes, Temperament

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The Bull Terrier

Bull Terriers are a type of terrier that are best known for their outwardly sloped “egg” faces. For many people, the most recognizable Bull Terrier is Spot, the Target mascot. We will discuss the Bull Terrier’s origins, stereotypes, and the reasons that this breed makes a wonderful companion.

The Origin of the Bull Terrier

Bull Terriers have a long history, dating back to the early 1800’s in England. Initially, “Bull and Terrier” breeds had two purposes: for vermin control, and for participation in popular blood sports of the day. The original Bull and Terrier breeds were based on Old English Bulldogs (a now-extinct breed) and Old English Terriers. Since the exact lineage of these dogs is unknown, it is probable that other terrier breeds were represented as well.

As a group of dogs, Bull and Terrier breeds were intended to have the speed and agility of the more lightly built terriers, but the tenacity of the Bulldog. The goal was to create an animal that would perform well in combat situations. This was required for animals used in blood sports. Sadly, many of these dogs were bred for fighting bulls and bears for entertainment, which necessitated a strong-willed, fearless animal that had both strength and speed.

Despite the value of a bulldog / terrier cross during the evolution of the Bull Terrier, little was done to preserve the ancestry of this dog. No breed standards existed until the mid-1900’s, and breeding was solely based on performance measures, as opposed to the dog’s appearance. Eventually, Bull and Terrier breeds were divided into two groups: Bull Terriers and Staffordshire Bull Terriers. The latter of which was smaller and easier to handle than the former.

The 1850’s

In the mid-1850’s, James Hinks began breeding Bull and Terrier type dogs to the now-extinct English White Terrier. His intention was to create an animal with a cleaner appearance, better legs, and a nicer head than standard terriers. In 1862, he entered a dog named “Puss” into the Bull Terrier Class in a Chelsea dog show. Puss was immediately popular, and thus “Hinks Breed,” also known as “The White Cavalier,” was born. Over time, what is now known as the Bull Terrier was bred with Dalmatian, Whippet, Spanish Pointer, Borzoi, and Rough Collie to create the dog as we know it today. The first modern Bull Terrier, named “Lord Gladiator,” was recognized in 1917.

Although Tom Hinks set out to create an all-white dog, there are many health problems associated with all-white coloring, including deafness. In 1936, the AKC began recognizing colored Bull Terriers, with brindle being the preferred coloring today.

Bull Terrier Stereotypes

Bull Terriers are not commonly considered a fighting breed. However, to the uninformed they suffer from many of the same stereotypes as other bully breeds. Indeed, the blanket term “pit bull” commonly includes Bull Terriers.
One of the top stereotypes of this breed is that it is vicious, which could not be further from the truth. In fact, part of the breed standard for the Bull Terrier is a “gentleman” temperament.

Another common stereotype of pit bull-type dogs is that they have locking jaws, which will latch onto humans, dogs, or other animals and never let go. Again, this stereotype has been proven time and again to be merely a myth.

Bull Terriers are also unfairly assumed to be poor candidates for living with children and other pets. It is true that some terriers are inherently dog-aggressive. However, the Bull Terrier is well known for its ability to get along well with other animals, especially when properly socialized. Similarly, Bull Terriers are widely considered one of the top breeds for children, due to their fun-loving nature.

While people commonly assume that all forms of pit bulls have been bred for fighting, this is simply not true. Indeed, James Hinks’ original Bull Terrier was not intended for the fighting ring, and instead as a “gentleman’s companion.”

Bull Terriers as Companions

What makes Bull Terriers great dogs and companions? The typical Bull Terrier personality should be charming, mischievous, and playful, which is why this dog is revered by many. Part of the reason this breed was initially called the “White Cavalier” is because of the level of chivalry a Bull Terrier is supposed to possess. For instance, this dog should never start a fight, but should be courageous enough to finish one.

Additionally, the Bull Terrier socializes well with both humans and other animals. Indeed, according to a poll conducted by the American Kennel Club, 94% of Bull Terrier owners say this breed is good with children. In addition, 84% of owners say this breed is good with other dogs. Since the Bull Terrier was never intended to be a pit-fighter, few Bull Terriers display inherent dog-aggression.

For many dog owners, Bull Terriers are ideal because they can be very independent dogs. They have an even temperament and accept discipline well. At times they can be stubborn, which makes them better for experienced dog owners; however, they are extremely people-oriented pets. As with any dog, socialization is necessary for ensuring they get along well with unfamiliar people and animals. In terms of temperament, a 2008 German study showed that the Bull Terrier most closely matches that of the Golden Retriever. The Golden Retriever is widely regarded as one of the most family-friendly canine companions.

The Standard Bull Terrier

The Bull Terrier is a short, dense dog that weighs 55 – 65 lbs. Shorter in stature than a typical pit bull, these dogs make great companions for people who prefer a smaller dog. Miniature Bull Terriers also exist. They stand only 14’’ tall at the shoulder, and are approximately half the height of the Standard Bull Terrier. The average lifespan of this breed is 10 – 14 years, which typical for a dog of this size. Bull Terriers do not require extensive grooming, due to their short, rough coat.
Ultimately, the Bull Terrier is an older breed with origins in England. Bull Terriers are unfairly stereotyped, like all “pit bulls”. At the end of the day, they make fantastic companions due to their friendly and loving nature.

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Ruff House Rescue | Millions of Adobtable Pets are sitting in Shelters

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Ruff House Rescue

Ruff House Rescue saves homeless pets from kill shelters here, and across the country. Animal rescue has become a necessity because euthanasia is the primary solution. Shelters (funded by your tax dollars) have been put in place to solve the homeless pet problem. Without rescues like Ruff House, countless more would perish in the shelter system, which euthanizes healthy, adoptable pets every day.

Ruff House Rescue pulls hundreds of animals every year from these shelters and finds these pets the loving homes they deserve. Ruff House is comprised of dedicated volunteers, who give their time and their love to help save so many. Once having been rescued by us from a shelter, each pet is vaccinated, altered and micro-chipped. They are loved and cared for until they find a home to call their own. This could take a day or a year. No adoptable animal is euthanized.

Bully Girl Magazine had a chance to sit down with the president and founder Diane Indelicato for an exclusive interview, to let her explain what Ruff House Rescue is all about. Here is what she had to say:

Tell our readers about Ruff House Rescue, and how it all began.

Ruff House Rescue started in 2009. We’re a 501c 3 organization. There has always been a tremendous need for rescue, especially for the bully breed. We started pulling pit bull breeds and other breeds from the Manhattan and Brooklyn shelters, and rehoming them. We have foster homes for our dogs, and we have our own facility here in Freeport, NY on the nautical mile. Our dogs are spayed, neutered, vaccinated and microchipped before they go to a new home. Adopters must be approved before any dog is sent home. We’ve rescued and found new forever homes for a lot of dogs since our inception.

Do you focus on mostly rescuing bully breeds, or do you rescue all dog breeds?

We rescue all types of dogs. A lot of people are confused with what dog rescue actually means. While we encourage dog adoption, we do understand that bully breed dogs aren’t for everybody, so we do rescue and find homes for all types of dogs. People are very open to adopting, so we want them to understand know that there are all types of dogs to adopt, and that rescuing doesn’t pertain to any one breed of dog. They can come in and meet all of the different breeds that we have rescued, and see which is the perfect fit for their family.

Explain to our readers, why it is so important to spay or neuter their pets.

Rescuing is not just all about adopting out dogs to new homes. It’s also about educating people to help them understand why they need to spay and neuter their pets. The main reason is because millions of beautiful, adoptable pets around the world are sitting in shelters, and are euthanized daily. I don’t think there is enough awareness. I think people need to get involved, and make a difference. Adopting might not be as convenient as going to a puppy store or breeder, but for every puppy or dog that you are buying a shelter dog is being euthanized somewhere. So we just want people to be educated and aware of what is going on.

What would be the best way for someone who is looking to adopt, to get in touch with Ruff House Rescue?

To adopt a puppy or dog from our facility, please visit our website at www.ruffhouserescue.org. You can also email us at [email protected], or you can visit our facebook page at facebook.com/ruffhouserescueny.

 

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